From the album Ours and the Shepherds

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Lyrics

October 1915 – November 25 1977


Aboriginal Veterans fought and lost their lives in three wars and various military actions on behalf of Canada. Many were decorated as heroes, but upon their return home, they were unable to obtain the same benefits other Veterans received. Further, these Veterans had to extinguish their aboriginal rights, preventing them from returning to their own communities to live.


Sgt. Tommy Prince was from the Brokenhead Ojibway Nation in Scanterbury, Manitoba. He was decorated by King George VI at Buckingham Palace, with both the Military Medal and on behalf of President Roosevelt, the Silver Star with ribbon. Prince was one of 59 Canadians who were awarded the Silver Star during the Second World War. Only three Canadians of this group also possessed the Military Medal.


Born in a canvas tent, under red leaves in 1915.
Great-great grandson of the Salteaux Chief Peguis.
In Brokenhead 4, the southwest shore of Lake Winnipeg.


Where there were war songs. Where there were war songs.
Where there were war songs, where there were war songs.


Tommy Prince enlisted for service in 1940.
1st SSF, Devil’s Brigade, on Anzio’s bodied beach.
A warrior came home, 10 medals and a Silver Star,
To Brokenhead’s pulpwood camps and weekend drinking halls


where there were no war songs. There were no war songs.
There were no war songs, there were no war songs.


Gaawiin gegoo bhwanzhi naga moon nun.
Gaawiin gegoo bhwanzhi naga moon nun.


Verna Prince had left him; Child Services took the girls.
He drank down his memory and pawned his Silver Star for
one saving bottle and Harbour Light’s mattress on the floor.
Flagged coffin lowered, Brokenhead sang, ‘The Death Of A Warrior.’


But there are no war songs. There are no war songs.
There are no war songs, there are no war songs.


Gaawiin gegoo bhwanzhi naga moon nun.
Gaawiin gegoo bhwanzhi naga moon nun.